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According to the American Cancer Society, there are about 21,900 new cases of ovarian cancer and 15,460 deaths due to the disease per year. 80% of those are already in the later stages. It’s time for a change!

Message From Marli - Ovarian Cancer


Early Detection (Marlis Message)
NEVER ignore symptoms of any kind! The symptoms of ovarian cancer usually mimic those of less life-threatening diseases, so doctors have a hard time diagnosing ovarian cancer merely from the symptoms. They vary for each person and can seem like those of less life-threatening conditions, like irritable bowel syndrome or bladder disorders.

Listen to your body and insist that your doctor takes your symptoms seriously.

 

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Symptoms include:

  • BLOATING
  • PELVIC/ABDOMINAL PAIN
  • URGE TO URINATE FREQUENTLY
  • DIFFICULTY EATING OR FEELING FULL QUICKLY
  • PROBLEMS WITH INDIGESTION
  • UNEXPLAINED BOWEL CHANGES
  • CONSTANT FATIGUE OR BACK PAIN
  • CONSTIPATION OR DIARRHEA
  • MENSTRUAL IRREGULARITIES
  • PAIN DURING INTERCOURSE

The only tests that will be able to properly diagnose Ovarian Cancer are:

  • The Bimanual Pelvic Exam, which is a complete pelvic exam consists of a recto-vaginal exam feeling the uterus, vagina, ovaries, fallopian tubes, bladder, and rectum to find any abnormality in shape and size.
  • Ca125 Blood test, or a blood test used to measure the level of the CA-125, a tumor marker that is often found in higher-than-normal amounts in the blood of women with ovarian cancer. If it comes back progressively more elevated each time, even if the values are low, this is an indication that the condition could very likely be serious.
  • Transvaginal Ultrasound, referring to the use of high-frequency sound waves. These waves, which cannot be heard by humans, are aimed at the ovaries. The pattern of the echoes they produce creates a picture called a sonogram. Healthy tissues, fluid-filled cysts, and tumors look different on this picture.
  • Lower GI series, or Barium Enema which is a series of the colon and rectum. The pictures are taken after the patient is given an enema with a white, chalky solution containing barium. The barium outlines the colon and rectum on the x-ray, making tumors or other abnormal areas easier to see.
  • CT (or CAT) scan, which is a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine.